This week’s post is part of the Monthly Career Collective Bloggers. This month’s topic is: How to Heat Up Your Job Search.  Scroll down to see what my fellow writer’s suggest!

Is being unemployed  feeling like a chronic condition?  Chronic — it’s not sexy,  exciting or fun.  Worse, chronic means it’s not changing and won’t go away.  Those of us with chronic illness know all about this chronic syndrome.  It weighs you down and keeps you from being “light on your feet”.

So, how do you find hope when you’re feeling your  condition is  “chronic”?  Perspective. What do I mean?  Check out American World Soccer Cup Team goalie, Tim Howard.

Here’s a guy with a very difficult to manage and off-putting chronic illness, Tourette  Syndrome.  Living with this, he’s risen to world class athlete status.  He’s the focal point of media attention that makes his visible, and to many oft-putting, symptoms very public.  FYI – I read somewhere that his mother said that she thought that playing soccer goalie, which requires supreme focus, helped his Tourette’s symptoms.  He didn’t twitch as much when he played.  My bet is he played often!

Few of us, even if we were healthy,  have the stamina or determination of Tim Howard.  But I believe that there’s usually something to  learn from people who achieve the extraordinary that we can apply to our own lives.

When you look at your job opportunities and the employment landscape, do you think, ” I’ll never find work”?  Are you blaming it on a  lousy job market, a difficult illness, your age or even the time of year?  They could all be true.

But — and here’s the thing — can you find something that you are good at and  you can do  and work this angle as hard as possible?

OK – most likely you won’t be playing for the Soccer World Cup or the NBA.  You might not get to be president of the company.  But your challenge is to get out of the chronically unemployed syndrome.  Can you do it?

Let’s face it.  You can’t do as much as you’d like to impact your chronic illness.  But you can take charge of  taking care of yourself as best you can.  The same is true with your employment.  What are you going to do about it?

CareerCollective Bloggers have this to say:

 

13 Responses to “Getting out from under chronic”  

  1. 1 Meg Montford

    While everyone has some kind of barrier to attaining the job they want, each of us also has special gifts that makes us unique. When we tap into our uniqueness, we can find our passion and our drive to succeed. I have coached a book editor with fibromyalgia, a marketing manager with bipolar disorder, a chef with diabetes – they’ve all managed their own accommodations to make their careers work. Often if you don’t see it as a disability, others won’t either.

  2. 2 Rosalind

    That’s such a good take on this. Thanks for adding your thoughts, Meg.

  3. 3 GL Hoffman

    I appreciate the plight of the chronically ill. The role of attitude is so important. Although most of us able bodied and non-chronic sufferers try our best to identify with the tough real world situations many face, we tend to forget over time. That is when a can-do attitude can be the second thing we remember about you.

  4. 4 Rosalind

    As always, your insights on “spot on”. Thanks GL.

  5. 5 Smithf830

    I really like your blog.. very nice colors &amp theme. Did you make this website yourself or did you hire someone to do it for you? Plz respond as I’m looking to construct my own blog and would like to know where u got this from. thank you ddedebgcfgaekfbc

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  6. 6 Sterling Career Concepts Blog
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  8. 8 Light the Fire Under Your Feet – Career Sherpa
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